speakers

Take a Mental Health Day. Or Three.

Photo by bigapple/iStock / Getty Images

We're deep in the throes of programming Techonomy '18, the flagship conference for Techonomy Media. It will be 3 days of intense discussions about the impact of technology on business and society and given the current state of things, some of the conversations are taking a dystopian turn. But that keeps it interesting, right?

Techonomy founder and host David Kirkpatrick  has been writing about some of the things you can expect while you're there and the variety of voices you will hear. I'm excited that Manoush will be joining the program to talk about her revolutionary journalism experiment (if you haven't started listening to her new podcast ZigZag, you should probably go ahead and catch up now). We've also got Marissa Mayer joining us - can't wait to hear what she's working on these days; and, Tim Berners-Lee, who will shed some light on what the internet has become. There will be a live debate, hosted by the Intelligence Squared folks (and the topic they're developing is super provocative) and a live musical performance by a special guest (we're debating internally - so many bands!). 

And, it will be at the Ritz Carlton in Half Moon Bay, CA. Without a doubt, one of the most beautiful places in the country (see photo!). So, yea -- you should probably find a way to join the program. Your brain and your body will thank you for it. (and if you want to learn more about how to participate, email me)

 

 

 

Techonomy New York

This week, the Techonomy team hits New York in what promises to be a provocative, informative, action-packed conference. Former WPP CEO Martin Sorrell will open and iconic NY chef Eric Ripert will close day one, May 8; and celebrated environmentalist Jeffrey Sachs gets things going on day two, May 9 - which wraps up with discussions about AI, robots, blockchain, and inevitably, Facebook (co-founder Chris Hughes is our final speaker). 

If you're interested in attending, head over to our events page

Photo by brazzo/iStock / Getty Images

For Women Only (a new event series)

Photo by AzmanL/iStock / Getty Images

Long before #metoo and the recent awareness about women's issues, I was having conversations about how to create something for women - an event, a media platform, a company. A platform for diverse female voices to talk about real issues, solve problems, and just have a comfortable place to hang out with like-minded women. 

As an event producer and programmer, I find the lack of female representation at conferences appalling, and have worked to correct it where possible. It is more difficult than it should be to get a company to put forward a female speaker. I've heard many ridiculous excuses and have often been ignored when requesting a female speaker, even when pressing to hit a 50/50 gender balanced stage. The recent call out of lack of female presenters at CES by the Advertising industry is a step in the right direction, for sure; but we still have a long way to go. 

In response, I'm starting an event series for women. It's not the most original idea, of course, but I have been thinking about doing it for a long time. There's no reason to wait. I have two amazing partners in this effort - Manoush Zomorodi, who is a co-founder and host; and, Amee Mungo, a digital strategist and entrepreneur who has been scheming with me for years. 

Our first event is on January 25 in NYC. Our mission is to build a strong, vibrant community of women who don't need anyone's permission or promotion to speak. We will cover issues that we grapple with every day, and provide an open, supportive network from which to pull inspiration, ideas, and energy. Away from the internet, IRL. 

Details: 

Thursday, January 25
5:30PM at
Norwood Club

Our first event features Manoush in conversation with Azita Ardakani about how our unconscious world shapes our career more than we know; and that by having a relationship with our inner world, we can empower what we create in our outer world.

If you're interested in learning more, please get in touch

 

Commit to 50/50, at minimum.

A few days ago, a number of high-powered executives called out CES for the lack of female speakers on the upcoming 2018 program. The Drum brought the story to life and asked for comments. So we contributed, glad to see this become part of a larger conversation. 

This is an issue we've grappled with for years, not only for major industry conferences and events, but on projects where diversity of thought is a key component of changing direction, shifting culture, and driving innovation. And even though they recognize the need to change things up, there are far too many leaders who prefer to stay comfortable with things as they've always been.
Gender balance, diversity of perspective, and inclusion should be imperatives for anyone who produces and programs an event. Any organization that doesn’t recognize the importance of this moment is simply not progressing at a modern pace. 

IMG_3875.jpg
IMG_3876.jpg

Edits from The Edit

There's an internal debate going on at Studio Kairos about which medium is most valuable when sharing news and content - a blog, a newsletter, or social? Social trumps all, I think, so really the question is what complements that effort? To find out, we've been off the blog for a few weeks to work on our version of a newsletter. It's called The Edit and we launched it this week. Here are a few stories that were in the newsletter - and, a few that weren't. 

If you're interested in receiving The Edit in your Inbox once a month, let us know!

September is Productivity Month

Dan Costa interviews NerdWallet founder & CEO Tim Chen about the future of finance. 

Dan Costa, Editor-In-Chief of PCMag.com, was recently in San Francisco to interview several tech company founders about productivity, including Tim Chen (above), the CEO of NerdWallet. Tim thinks of NerdWallet as a "book of maps" for personal finance, orienting people so they can make the best financial decisions for every stage of life. He and Dan covered a lot of ground in their conversation - how NerdWallet is applying social to a FinTech product, Millennial consumers, Artificial Intelligence, Bitcoin, and why Tim tries to "be more analog", only checking into Twitter every 3 months. Listen to the interview with Tim on the Fast Forward podcast

8742cee3-8ea4-4c86-a9d0-d4bfb34f302f.png

Can your office furniture impact your productivity? Sophia Stuart recently visited the Herman Miller showroom in Culver City, CA, for a look at Live OS, the company’s new sensor equipped desks.  

Ryan Anderson, head of commercialization for Herman Miller's IoT Solutions, spoke with Stuart about the concept behind the furniture. Anderson commented, "We asked ourselves, what would it look like to have sensor-enabled furniture? In a mobile-first workplace, what are the new patterns of behavior?" To find out the answers, read Sophia’s article.

 Cocktail hour at Lazy Bear, San Francisco

Cocktail hour at Lazy Bear, San Francisco

Fine Dining, Disrupted

Inside a nondescript, dodgy-looking building in the Mission is one of San Francisco’s most innovative dining experiences: Lazy Bear, a “modern American dinner party”. Once an exclusive supper club started by lawyer-turned-chef David Barzelay, Lazy Bear has become one of the hottest dining events in the city.

You arrive, your coat is whisked into a closet, and a handsome host sweeps you into the cocktail lounge, where you're handed a welcome drink from the communal punchbowl. You dine on cocktail "snacks" like whipped scrambled eggs and soft-shell crab while getting to know fellow guests before dinner begins.

Each seating at Lazy Bear is limited to 40 people, split between two communal dining tables in a gorgeous, dramatically lit room. Dishes are presented individually, passionately introduced by a chef as servers deliver them to the table. It's an evening designed for interaction - conversation is encouraged, and diners are invited into the kitchen, which is open to the dining room, to chat with the chefs as they cook. 

Creating scarcity: "Each month’s tickets go on sale all at once, usually at noon on a Wednesday in the middle of the previous month." And they are sold out every month. October reservations are on sale now.
Lazy Bear, 3416 19th St, San Francisco, CA

 L.A. band Warpaint at Outside Lands.

L.A. band Warpaint at Outside Lands.

And finally, we spent the last few weeks of summer cooling off in the bay area and hit Outside Lands, the music festival held every August in Golden Gate Park.

Artists we loved:
Royal Blood - what Mike Kerr can do with a bass guitar is nothing short of extraordinary.

Maggie Rogers - to understand the buzz, watch her blow away Pharrell Williams during her final masterclass at NYU (and you can hear more about her process for writing that song, "Alaska", on Song Exploder)

Sleigh Bells, a band we've been following since 2008. The difference in their performance between those early days and now is astonishing. Alexis Krauss is a force, reminding us to practice, practice, practice.

To hear music from this year's festival, hit the playlist button below.

On the Future of Travel: an interview with Hotel Tonight's Amanda Richardson

The latest Fast Forward conversation: an interview with Hotel Tonight's Chief Data and Strategy Officer, the fabulous Amanda Richardson. Dan and Amanda discuss "real-time pricing, the incredible power of user data in crafting products, and the existential threat of Google swallowing up all service industries."

July Updates: Independence and Innovation

July is halfway over, and while the summer months might make us nostalgic for the days of summer camp, road trips, and one hit wonders, the Studio Kairos crew has been working too hard to think about anything other than the next project. (and we have some exciting new work on the horizon!) In the meantime, here's what some of our speakers have been up to... 

Josh Robin reported from Queens on the 40th anniversary of the Hindu Temple Society of North America, the first Hindu temple in North America.  Opened on the site of a former Russian Orthodox Church, the temple was first opened on July 4, 1977. Congregants weren’t welcomed into the neighborhood right away, so they welcomed the neighborhood into the congregation. Located on Bowne Street, the temple was smack dab in the same location where John Bowne had fought for religious freedom in the colonies.

Dan Costa was recently asked to define what PCMag fights against. Not used to thinking in these terms, Dan finally realized, “Some enemies are worth having, and some battles reveal who you really are...I'm talking about PCMag picking the right fights. So let's get ready to rumble!”  Dan and PCMag are fighting against Brand Spin, Payola, Fanboys, and Hack Journalism.  You can read more about it here.

Sophia Stuart spent time at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles learning about IVEY, “a small, —just 13.5 inches tall—robot named for the IV procedures it helps young patients endure.” IVEY is just one of the new technologies being used at CHLA - there is also a family Fitbit challenge, and an entire program dedicated to innovation.  

Since we can’t take IVEY home with us, how about adopting a puppy named Cramp, Satty, or Booncy? John Keefe spent one Saturday creating a program that generated an algorithm mimicking dog names. Unfortunately, the names aren’t real, but if you adopt a dog, we’re sure John would be happy to let you use one.

Last month’s blog post mentioned Dan’s trip to D.C. to interview Peter Cherukuri, President & Chief Innovation Officer for DC startup incubator 1776, and Aneesh Chopra, who was the first U.S. CTO under Obama. The podcasts are up on PCMag.com - keep an eye out for new Fast Forward podcasts in the upcoming weeks.

To get in touch with Josh, Dan, Sophia, John, and the rest of the Studio Kairos team for an event or project, say hello and tell us about it! We'd love to hear from you.

June Updates: Books, Cyborgs, and Apple

Time is flying - it's hard to believe that it's almost summer, even though it's been in the 90's in New York City this week. Summer certainly doesn't mean down time for the Studio Kairos crew, and here are some of the things we're working on this month.

Manoush is working on the audio recording of her book, Bored and Brilliant, which will be out this fall, on September 5. Place your pre-order here. While she's doing that, we're working on an October book tour as well as other appearances that go well into 2018. 

Sophia continues to write for a number of publications, including PCMagWWD and Singularity Hub, as well as some lucky private clients. When I last sat down with Sophia in Los Angeles, we got into deep conversation about how Hollywood plays a role in technology development and why Los Angeles is the city of the future. Two thought provoking topics worthy of further exploration and discussion, for sure.

Photo by Melpomenem/iStock / Getty Images

Dan's latest Fast Forward podcasts have had him in San Francisco at the recent Apple event and at the Hotel Tonight HQ talking with Chief Data & Strategy Officer Amanda Richardson, as well as in Washington DC where he chatted with Peter Cherukuri, President & Chief Innovation Officer for DC startup incubator 1776, and Aneesh Chopra, who was the first U.S. CTO under Obama. Stay tuned for those podcasts, which will be posted on PCMag.com very soon. 

Meanwhile, you can listen to Dan's conversation with Go Kart Labs' Adam Dole, recorded last week at Go Kart's launch event (which we produced) to celebrate their new DC location. Adam interviewed Dan about the Apple news, AI, and what to expect in the digital home market.

As always, to have Manoush, Sophia, Dan, or any of our other smart speakers swing by to talk about what's coming in the ever-changing world of technology, or just spark some inspiration with a future-forward talk, please get in touch.

Building Emotional Machines

In another conversation from SXSW, Dan talks to Sophie Kleber, Executive Director of Product and Innovation at HUGE, about building emotional machines. AI was a major topic at SXSW this year, from concerns about machines taking jobs from humans to the amazing things that machines will be able to do for us in the future. Sophie talks about what emotional computing is and gives some examples, along with why designers (and product developers) need to start designing for emotional intelligence now.

Shot at the HUGE Speakeasy in Austin at SXSW.